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Someone We Used to Love

Lydmor

Hfn
HFN115BP | 2020-05-15  
Lydmor’s new single ”Someone we used to love” is a diverse song that shows both the introverted and more elaborate sides of the electronic pop artist's unique and captivating universe.

'Someone We Used To Love' is partly influenced by the Irish author Oscar Wilde and his classic novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' from 1890. The novel quotes: 'There is always something ridiculous about the emotions of people whom one has ceased to love". This quote has inspired Lydmor in the creation of her new single.

Lydmor explains about 'Someone We Used To Love':
“I think it’s a very appropriate, arrogant and fantastic thing to shed light on - that thing that happens to us when we have loved someone whom we have now stopped loving. When that person still shows feelings and you find yourself just thinking, "pull yourself together, honestly". Or if that person shows feelings for someone else and you become like "how can you love someone after loving me? I should be stuck in your heart forever." This whole thing about people we once loved, where we, almost no matter what is going on emotionally inside, react with disgust. In "Someone We Used To Love" I have taken a scenario where I imagine myself sitting with someone I’m still in love with and you can see this person reacting with this kind of cold disgust, and I’m just sitting there about to break and burst into tears. And you just know that you are completely pathetic”.

In the song, the awkward situation assumes an almost grotesque character. “Nothing matters less to us then the feelings of someone we used to love / nothing is as grotesque to us as the feelings of someone we used to love,” Lydmor sings in the chorus.

The song frames the vulnerability that such a scenario can give. But at the same time, 'Someone We Used To Love' also contains an element of strength. A strength that comes with the recognition of one's fragility, for when one reaches that realization, one is suddenly in a strong position where liberation is underway.
The contrast between fragility and strength is also supported by the song’s composition where the production goes from icy cold and minimalist to dramatic and bass-heavy.

Lydmor describes:
"I wanted to make a real fragile banger! It should have a proper hero chorus. The song has taken a long time to produce because I have been such a perfectionist about it. I tried about 50 different versions of the song until I found the right one ”.

There is an eternal unpredictability connected to Lydmor's work. She is constantly exploring new sides of her artistic endeavour. This year Lydmor was involved in cross-aesthetic collaborations with the dance company Corpus at the Royal Theatre. She has also created the soundscape for a new stage production of William Shakespeare's ' Twelfth night’', which is scheduled to run at “Oslo Ny Teater” this autumn.

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